Archive for September 2009

Membership prices

You may be thinking that our membership prices are too cheap considering all the features and services we offer for FULL ACCESS MEMBERSHIP.

At H-YPE, we actually think that the other herpes and HPV sites are too expensive. Why do they charge

You may be thinking that our membership prices are too cheap considering all the features and services we offer for FULL ACCESS MEMBERSHIP.

At H-YPE, we actually think that the other herpes and HPV sites are too expensive. Why do they charge so much? We honestly don’t know. They may feel justified in charging astronomical amounts but we think they are simply taking advantage of your situation.

Our FULL ACCESS membership prices are as follows:

30 days – £3.95
90 days – £8.95
180 days – £15.95
365 days – £28.95

STANDARD membership is free but will give you limited access. We have kept the prices for FULL ACCESS low so that everyone can get the support they need based on neccessity and not their salary.

H-YPE constantly strives for excellence and our promise to you is that we will continue to make H-YPE the best, most secure and enjoyable site dedicated to herpes and HPV. The majority of your membership fee goes toward improving server response time, site development costs and staff administration in an effort to keep this promise.

To be or not to Herpe – sensitive login

No it’s not H-YPE’s version of a Shakespearean herpetic Hamlet but a more discerning way of logging in without the dreaded H words jumping out all over the page. This new login will prevent those unwanted eyes lurking in the shadows from discovering yo

No it’s not H-YPE’s version of a Shakespearean herpetic Hamlet but a more discerning way of logging in without the dreaded H words jumping out all over the page. This new login will prevent those unwanted eyes lurking in the shadows from discovering your secret.

In order for search engines like Google, Yahoo or MSN to find us more easily, we need to have certain keywords like herpes dating community or genital warts appear on our site. This is to attract more people for you to meet and to help those that need our support but to do that they must be able to find us.

Now that you have found us, some of you may feel paranoid about having herpes or HPV references in your computer. Hence the more minimal usage of such words throughout the rest of this site.

To help get you there we have the regular login or the new sensitive login. The sensitive login is makes no reference to anything “H” so if you are are all nervous about using a herpes or HPV dating site then we suggest you bookmark it when you are there.

Help the HVA solve their funding crisis at no extra cost to yourself

Why is their a crisis?

The Department of Health has said “No more money after March 2009″. Now they have a £25,000 hole in their yearly budget. The ‘herpes stigma’ makes it hard for them to fundraise.

Why is their a crisis?

The Department of Health has said “No more money after March 2009″. Now they have a £25,000 hole in their yearly budget. The ‘herpes stigma’ makes it hard for them to fundraise.

What can you do to help?

Do your shopping on-line through ‘EasyFundraising’ portal: 100s of shops are there. Choose Shingles Support Society (one of their names) as ‘your charity’.

  • Go to the following URL http://www.easyfundraising.org.uk
  • Register your details on that site – it’s free
  • Choose Shingles Support Society as ‘your charity’
  • Click on a company – and shop
  • Part of what you spend will go to the HVA – easy

You can choose from over 600 high street names such as AA, Amazon, Asda, Boots, Comet, Dell, Marks & Spencer, Next, Toys”R”Us, Whittards, Yahoo and Yves Rocher…..just to name a few.

You don’t have to use the word “herpes” when you register. It doesn’t cost you a penny – it’s for the benefit of the HVA. Shop through easyfundraising every time!

Can one have a normal birth with herpes?

Herpes homebirth

According to the stats, one in Five Americans has genital herpes. At one point the females within that figure will conceive and be faced with the challenges of a natural birth with herpes. The risked posed to the newborn child of coming into contact with the mothers lesions if she is having an outbreak at the time of birth. Scary business. Naish and Roberts in their book Healthy Lifestyle Better pregnancy writes …. [One infection that may persist into pregnancy, regardless of your preconception care, is herpes, as the virus is impossible to eradicate. It is a particular problem if there are lesions present in the birth canal at the time of delivery. This can have severe repercussions for the health of the baby, including brain damage, blindness or death, and a caesarean section may be necessary.

It was happy to remain dormant if I played by the rules which were very simply. Eat well. In fact my herpes outbreaks have come to signal to me today that something is not right within my body and is an ally rather than the enemy. I knew that I had more than reasonable amount of control over my outbreaks. I knew what brought them on and could anticipate within eight hours of eating a culprit food the tell tale signs that it was going to happen, that I would have an outbreak. Armed with this knowledge I ate right. I supplemented my diet with nutitional supplement to ensure that spur of the moment cravings would not undermine my strategy because I know what it is like wanting to have a pizza, badly, being to tired to cook and tasting the pizza knowing it’s only a phone call and fifteen minutes away. That craving can be doubly worse when pregnant. So I armed myself. Was I getting enough calcium? And my zinc stores were they adequate? Every pregnant woman especially one with herpes should read Naish and Roberts’ Healthy Lifestyle Better Pregnancy and stick to the chapter on supplements. I would swear by it.

I will admit I was thrown off once during my pregnancy. Six nems fried in God knows what oil from the Chinese fast food on an afternoon when I had nothing in the fridge. Never again. Never. What if I had done that closer to my due date. I was brought quickly to my senses and since then the fridge or cupboard has never been bare and I’ve never had another outbreak during a pregnancy. God forbid. Those risks are real and if you’re going to go for the natural birth your commitment must be firm and your will is never to waiver.

Milk was off the menu, any dairy product for that matter and glutin. So forget the pizza. Sunflower oil or anything fried in it. And stress. All reasonably within my control. There are alternative sources of calcium and glutin free cereals like amaranth and quinoa are nutritionally packed foods (just get yourself a mill and be creative). As for stress I got my boss to pack in my classes all in the morning and with half an hour lunch time my day ended at two pm. After a half an hours walk back home I was free to relax on the sofa and go to sleep. What stress?

Oh yes the one which comes when your insides contract and try to expel the baby. Well if I got to this date outbreak free and providing this labour thing didn’t drag on for three days I would be home free. Because that’s the amount of time my body needs to transform stress, glutin or lactose into a live outbreak.

So what’s there to do? Find out what triggers your outbreak. Log it. Keep away from it. Find a substitute for it so that you don’t miss out on the nutrition the culprit food would provide. Ensure that your nutritional needs are being met and take your supplements as back up. You wouldn’t drive your car without insurance would you? Take them just in case. Take them to keep the cravings away for they don’t undermine your efforts at staying away from foods which trigger your outbreaks.

And relax. If push does come to shove (no pun intended) and you need to have a caesarean make peace with that before the date. Do your best but be willing to allow for the unpredictable, well in our case the possibly predictable.

Mandatory reading: Healthy Lifestyle Better Pregnancy By Naish and Roberts (If I could get this book in France it should be easier in an English speaking country)

Check out the book A Martyr for Mothers – mothering at the other end of the continuum ( the first chapter is called My Homebirth My Hospital Birth. The book is written by a mother who has herpes – me (Christy Charles) © Christy Charles June 2007


Extracted from http://www.authorsden.com/categories/article_top.asp?catid=16&id=31337

The upside of herpes – when one infection protects against another

When people say that every cloud has a silver lining, they probably aren’t thinking about herpes at the time. Herpes may be unpleasant, but the viruses that cause it and related diseases could have a bright side. In mice at least, they provide resistance against bacteria, including the bubonic plague.

Herpes is one of a number of itchy, blistering diseases, caused by the group of viruses aptly-named herpesviruses. Eight members infect humans and cause a range of illnesses including glandular fever, chickenpox, shingles and, of course, herpes itself.

Almost everyone gets infected by one of these eight during their childhood. But herpesviruses are for life, not just for Christmas. After your body fights off the initial infection, the virus retreats into a dormant phase known as ‘latency’. It remains hidden and causes no symptoms, but has the potential to reactivate at a later date. In this way, herpesviruses can seem like life-long parasites, ensuring their own survival at the cost of their host’s future health. In extreme cases, latent viruses can lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can cause autoimmune diseases, or some types of cancer.

But there is a bright side too. Erik Barton and colleagues from Washington University Medical School found that once infected mice entered the latent stage, they were surprisingly resistant to certain types of bacteria. Unlike their vulnerable uninfected peers, they even managed to ward off the deadly plague bug, Yersinia pestis.

At least in mice, latent herpesviruses turn out to be paying tenants rather than free-loading squatters – bacterial resistance is their rent. The latent stage is crucial to the resistance effect, and Barton found that a mutant herpesvirus that infects but doesn’t set up shop provides no benefits to its host.

The viruses work their magic by putting the immune system on high alert. The effect is similar to a raising of the terror alert creating a heightened level of security where the body is prepared to fight off any further threats.The viruses trigger the release of high levels of immune system chemicals called cytokines. These molecules – including interferon-gamma (IFN-g) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) – help to co-ordinate the defence against infections.

These chemicals activate macrophages – a type of white blood cell. These cellular assassins engulf invading bacteria, and sentence them to death by digestion. And in mice latently infected by herpesviruses, they are activated in bulk. This sequence is similar to the way the immune system normally protects us against multiple bacterial invaders. But in Barton’s experiments, the protection was set off by viruses instead, and lasted for much longer than normal.

All well and good for the mice, but do these viruses benefit us too? Barton thinks so. In his study, two very different strains – murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gHV68) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) – had the same effect. He believes that providing bacterial resistance is a general property of all herpesviruses.

There is certainly growing evidence to support his claims. If many people, the latent viruses reactivate regularly, but not strongly enough to cause major symptoms. In these cases, doctors have seen higher levels of cytokines and long-term activation of the immune system, just like Barton saw in his mice.

Barton even suggests that herpesvirus infection may play a role in protecting against allergies. According to the ‘hygeine hypothesis’, infections during childhood prime the immune system against future threats. By depriving children of these experiences, overly clean homes can lead to naïve immune systems that react disproportionately to harmless things like pollen. Allergies are the result.

It isn’t clear what role herpesviruses play in priming the immune system. But at least one study found that people who are infected with the Epstein-Barr herpesvirus (EBV) are less likely to show sensitive antibody reactions to allergens in their environment. Clearly, the subject is a rich vein for further research.

Almost everyone has had an encounter with a herpesvirus of some kind. They cause a wide range of diseases, but could they be protecting us from many more?


Article extracted from http://scienceblogs.com/notrocketscience/2009/02/the_upside_of_herpes_-_when_one_infection_protects_against_a.php